Viewing assembly binding logs using fuslogvw.exe

Sometimes it’s very useful analyze how an application binds to referenced assemblies but this process is fairly hidden from us. However, Microsoft has given us a way to look into this process via the fuslogvw tool. This tool is not overly documented so this post describes how to install it on a computer that has neither Visual Studio nor the Windows SDK installed, such as a server.

Follow these steps:

Copy the following files from a computer with Visual Studio or the Windows SDK installed:

  • "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\Bin\FUSLOGVW.exe"
  • "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\Bin\NETFX 4.0 Tools\1033\flogvwrc.dll"

Put them into a folder on the target computer.

Create logging folder, e.g. c:\fuslog

Start FUSLOGVW.exe. Update the following settings:

  • Log all binds to disk
  • Enable Custom log path
  • Custom log path = c:\fuslog\

Finally, enable assembly binding logging in the registry by setting the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Fusion\ForceLog value to 1.

Click Refresh in FUSLOGVW.exe and behold! A list of assembly binding events are displayed:

The individual events contain useful details:

/Emil

2014-11-10 Update: Removed the mention of editing the registry. I added that a little too quickly, fuslogvw.exe is supposed to do that stuff for us…

6 thoughts on “Viewing assembly binding logs using fuslogvw.exe”

  1. Thanks for the info! Slight edit…

    Finally, enable assembly binding logging in the registry by setting the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Fusion\ForceLog to 1.

  2. A screenshot of the regedit would be really nice.

    If you are invoking a process on a server using a client and teh server is throwing errors about DLLs, how do you configure fusLogVw to capture the error?

    Thanks.

  3. @RT2014, I actually removed that part again after having a second look at the post. Editing the registry should not be needed, that’s why we’re using fuslogvw.exe for 🙂

    If you really want to do it manually, browse to the Fusion key and and add a DWORD value called ForceLog and give it a value of 1.

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